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Monday, May 4, 2020 | History

3 edition of Broadcasting, the FCC, indeceny and the first amendment found in the catalog.

Broadcasting, the FCC, indeceny and the first amendment

Jacob Jefferson

Broadcasting, the FCC, indeceny and the first amendment

scrutiny and debate

by Jacob Jefferson

  • 249 Want to read
  • 8 Currently reading

Published by Nova Science Publisher"s Inc in Hauppauge, N.Y .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Broadcasting policy,
  • Law and legislation,
  • United States. Federal Communications Commission,
  • Obscenity (Law),
  • United States,
  • Broadcasting

  • Edition Notes

    Includes index.

    Statementeditors: Jacob Jefferson and Jennifer S. McGovern
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsKF2805 .B77 2012
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25054268M
    ISBN 109781621007753
    LC Control Number2011038320

    The seven dirty words are seven English-language words that American comedian George Carlin first listed in in his monologue "Seven Words You Can Never Say on Television". The words are: shit, piss, fuck, cunt, cocksucker, motherfucker, and tits. At the time, the words were considered highly inappropriate and unsuitable for broadcast on the public airwaves in the United States, whether. Censoring Indecency on the Radio Threatens Free Speech. Jonathan D. Wallace. Jonathan D. Wallace, a lawyer and software company executive, is the coauthor of Sex, Laws, and the following selection, he examines the case of Pacifica Foundation , in which the Supreme Court permitted the censorship of obscene words on radio broadcasts.

      Indecency&#;arguably among the most provocative and incendiary issues in today's media&#;is speech at the edge of social tolerance. This timely volume examines broadcast and Internet indecency from legal and social perspectives, utilizing current cases and Author: Jeremy Lipschultz.   But with FCC Chairman Pai admonishing broadcasters to “keep it clean,” and with the FCC’s indecency rules still on the books, and any complaint likely to cost time and money to defend, broadcasters may want to be cautious in their approach to these situations, even in .

      Federal Communications Commission (FCC) v. FOX Television Stations (FOX II, ) marked the most recent episode in the Supreme Court’s consideration of the regulation of indecency in the public broadcast medium. The Court’s decision in FOX II has given the FCC permission to revise, but not necessarily to abandon, its policies that interpret indecency in light of public interest and other Cited by: 1.   The radio station has a history of championing the First Amendment, having broadcast the comedian George Carlin’s “seven dirty words” routine that resulted in Author: Patricia Cohen.


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Broadcasting, the FCC, indeceny and the first amendment by Jacob Jefferson Download PDF EPUB FB2

Broadcasting, The FCC, Indecency and the First Amendment: Scrutiny and Debate (Media and Communications - Technologies, Policies and Challenges) by Jacob Jefferson (Editor), Jennifer S. Mcgovern (Editor)Format: Paperback. Discussing such controversial issues as 'shock jock' Howard Stern, this book treats broadcast indecency as more than a simple regulatory problem in American law.

The author's approach cuts across legal, social, and economic concerns taking the view that media law and regulation cannot be seen within a vacuum that ignores cultural realities.

Enforcement of the obscenity, indecency and profanity rules usually begins with complaints from the public that FCC staff review for possible violations.

If an investigation is warranted and the FCC finds a station in violation of its rules, it has the authority to revoke a station license, impose a fine or issue an admonishment or warning.

Broadcast Indecency and First Amendment Theory: The Future of Regulation in an International Context --App. Letters of Complaints --App.

Station Response Letters --App. Letters of Community Opposition. This cutting-edge book treats broadcast indecency as a social phenomenon challenging the policy approach of government regulation. It is an exploration of the political and social processes involved in the government control of mass media content.

This cutting-edge book treats broadcast indecency as a social phenomenon challenging the policy approach of government regulation. It is an exploration of the political and the FCC processes involved in the government control of mass media content. The author, using F.C.C.

documents and other sources, studies the complex issue of broadcast indecency and its impact on the mass media and the : Jeremy Harris Lipschultz. By contrast, indecency is often protected by the First Amendment, at least for adults.

Courts have sanctioned restricting indecent broadcasts between 6 a.m. and 10 p.m. Courts have sanctioned restricting indecent broadcasts during hours when children may be exposed to such programming.

In the first major landmark case on indecency over the airwaves, Federal Communications Commission v. "Broadcast and Internet indecency are fascinating areas of research. The issue of whether offensive speech that isn't legally obscene should be regulated has captured the interest of numerous legal scholars since the s.

In this book, Jeremy Lipschultz explores indecency from legal, social and theoretical perspectives. The Federal Communications Commission was established in and through its regulation of content carriers, such as broadcast media, has had significant impact on questions of First Amendment freedom.

The FCC, however, does have enforcement responsibilities in certain limited instances. For example, the Courts have said that indecent material is protected by the First Amendment to the Constitution and cannot be banned entirely.

It may be restricted, however, in order to avoid its broadcast when there is a reasonable risk that children may be. In certain respects, however, governmental regulation does implicate First Amendment values, and, in Red Lion Broadcasting Co.

FCC, the Court upheld an FCC regulation that required broadcasters to afford persons an opportunity to reply if they were attacked on the air on the basis of their “honesty, character, integrity or like personal qualities,” or if they were legally qualified candidates and a broadcast editorial endorsed.

Provides coverage of television and the Internet, showing how and why broadcasting has evolved from the ribald antics of the Roaring 20's to today's streaming cybersex, contrasting the standards and actions of the FCC v.

the First Amendment amidst the over-the-air and in-the-court battles of over-the-top radio.1/5(1). Although indecent speech is protected by the First Amendment, speech in broadcast media has been restricted because of its omnipresence and its accessibility to children.

Under the Federal Communications Commission's current policy, broadcast content is indecent if it includes content about sexual or excretory activities, or if it is patently offensive given contemporary community. "Indecent" speech usually receives First Amendment protection, except when it is broadcast over the airwaves.

In FCC v. Pacifica (), the Supreme Court held that the Federal Communications Commission could regulate indecent speech because broadcast media are both uniquely pervasive and uniquely accessible to children. law forbids, FCC from censoring radio or television broadcasts and among all media only broadcasting is forbidden from carrying indecent material.

iii. Broadcasters have first Amendment protected, but the protection is limited because of spectrum scarcity.

this allows costs to restrict indecency in broadcasting but in other media. Actionable indecency is a legal doctrine held by the Federal Communications Commission since the FCC vs.

Pacifica case, that broadcast speech can be regulated even if it does not contain the seven dirty words deemed "indecent". The FCC states on its website that indecent broadcasts are not actionable between 10 PM and 6 AM; however, init announced that "actionable indecency".

A FIRST AMENDMENT CENTER PUBLICATION 5 made against them. “We think that the fairness doctrine and its component personal attack and political editorializing regulations are a legitimate exercise of congressionally delegated authority,” the justices write.

TheFCCissuesitsfirstfinefor broadcast indecency to Philadelphia radio station. The FCC tightened its broadcast indecency rules in and began enforcing those rules more aggressively in Both cases involved the FCC retroactively censuring Fox and ABC for the profanity and nudity broadcast on their networks.

Fox received a formal reprimand, while ABC and a number of its affiliate stations received a $ million fine. Members of the Coalition include Beasley Broadcast Group, Inc.; Citadel Communications Corporation; Greater Media, Inc.; Radio One, Inc.; the First Amendment Project; the National Coalition Against Censorship; and the People for the American Way Foundation.

As organizations dedicated to defending the First Amendment, we ask the Committee to remain mindful of the balance between the fundamental right of freedom of expression and the "public interest" element of broadcast licenses during its consideration of the issue of broadcast indecency.

Update – FCC Concludes that the Colbert Broadcast Did Not Violate FCC Indecency Rules. By David Oxenford on Neither political party wants to be tagged with being pro-smut by one side of the political spectrum, or anti-First Amendment expression by the other.

Since the decision in FCC Television Stations, the FCC has begun a review of whether it should make changes to its current broadcast indecency .In Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) current policy, indecent speech is defined as the “language that describes, in terms patently offensive as measured by contemporary community standards for the broadcast medium, sexual or excretory activities and organs, at times of the day when there is a reasonable that children may be in the.